coffee house gem.

{bo-kaap, cape town} 

Woodstock, I like you. 

Woodstock, I like you. 

"Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart."

— Steve Jobs (thanks for sharing Amy)

ha, this is how I feel about now.
GOOD’s: Making Money While Making a Difference
and I know what everyone’s going to say: money doesn’t matter, it doesn’t bring you happiness or guarantee success. and I agree, for the most part, but there is still a small sense of self-preservation that you need. I’ve battled with this since exiting college, and it’s clear that aligning my career path to work in Africa proves that money is irrelevant to me. and it is, but if there could only be a way to boost your income just a tad more. It’d be nice to afford grad school and not pile on more loans or visit my family more than once a year. The balance is undeniably difficult.
But, the sacrifice is worth it, and I will continue to live minimally, appreciatively, and with true perspective on what brings me my happiness.
I came across a great little story that I want to share with you all:
The American investment banker was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellow fin tuna.  The American complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them. The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.” The American then asked, “Why didn’t you stay out longer and catch more fish?” The Mexican said, “With this I have more than enough to support my family’s needs.” The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?” The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos, I have a full and busy life.” The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and could help you. You should spend more time fishing; and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat: With the proceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you would sell directly to the  processor; eventually opening your own cannery. You would control the product, processing and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles and eventually New York where you will run your ever-expanding enterprise.” The Mexican fisherman asked, “But, how long will this all take?” To which the American replied, “15 to 20 years.” "But what then?" asked the Mexican. The American laughed and said that’s the best part. “When the time is right you would announce an IPO and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich, you would make millions.” "Millions?…Then what?" The American said, “Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take siesta with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos.

ha, this is how I feel about now.

GOOD’s: Making Money While Making a Difference

and I know what everyone’s going to say: money doesn’t matter, it doesn’t bring you happiness or guarantee success. and I agree, for the most part, but there is still a small sense of self-preservation that you need. I’ve battled with this since exiting college, and it’s clear that aligning my career path to work in Africa proves that money is irrelevant to me. and it is, but if there could only be a way to boost your income just a tad more. It’d be nice to afford grad school and not pile on more loans or visit my family more than once a year. The balance is undeniably difficult.

But, the sacrifice is worth it, and I will continue to live minimally, appreciatively, and with true perspective on what brings me my happiness.

I came across a great little story that I want to share with you all:

The American investment banker was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. 

Inside the small boat were several large yellow fin tuna.  The American complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them. 

The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.” 

The American then asked, “Why didn’t you stay out longer and catch more fish?” 

The Mexican said, “With this I have more than enough to support my family’s needs.” 

The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?” 

The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos, I have a full and busy life.” 

The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and could help you. You should spend more time fishing; and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat: With the proceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you would sell directly to the  processor; eventually opening your own cannery. You would control the product, processing and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles and eventually New York where you will run your ever-expanding enterprise.” 

The Mexican fisherman asked, “But, how long will this all take?” 

To which the American replied, “15 to 20 years.” 

"But what then?" asked the Mexican. 

The American laughed and said that’s the best part. “When the time is right you would announce an IPO and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich, you would make millions.” 

"Millions?…Then what?" 

The American said, “Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take siesta with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos.

Ugandan culture: Boda Bodas

Check out one of my favorite profile pieces I wrote for Invisible Children

——————

Onen Eric Kidega wakes up every morning at five a.m. As he prepares for work, Eric recites a morning prayer. This prayer not only acknowledges the difficulties he’s faced in the past, but it also gives thanks for living another day. After his morning routine is complete, Eric jumps onto his motorcycle and begins circling around town, joining the swarm of men already on their bikes. Hopefully after a short time, he will find his first customer; once he does, his day as a boda-boda driver officially begins.

***

Boda-bodas (meaning: border-border; boda for short) are motorcycle taxis that originated in east Africa and have become a dominant source of transportation for mzungus (foreigners) and locals alike. Whether you’re in the sleepy town of Gulu or in the hustle and bustle of Kampala, a boda is an easy, reliable way to maneuver through town.

The industry came about in the 1960s when people without proper paperwork for driving vehicles would use bicycles and motorbikes to cross international borders. Now 40 years later, it is estimated that roughly 3,000 boda drivers exist in the Gulu district. With the many complexities and people involved, I often wonder what goes on behind the scenes of theboda culture.

In an attempt to settle my curiosity about what has now become a Ugandan staple, I sought after Eric, my go-to boda driver, for insight and information.

Read More

Using Google +

Find me and add me! New to this venture, but liking it thus far. As I explained to my co-worker, Google + allows you to start over. Facebook has become too cluttered and overwhelming, like a storage space you never clean out, just continue to cram things in and hope it never explodes.

Here’s my info —> https://plus.google.com/103278619742747133074/posts

Tags: google plus

"Yoga: invigoration in relaxation. Freedom in routine. Confidence through self control. Energy within and energy without."

Have been tapping into my inner yogi and pushing, bending, and contorting myself through vinyasa, bikram, and ashtanga classes. Purchased a 1-month unlimited package to YogaLife (thank you, Group On!) and am trying to go 4-5 times a week. 

Tough, and my body is sore in places I never knew possible, but as a whole, I feel delighted and empowered. I enjoy seeking refuge in these sweaty classes alongside people of all shapes and sizes who indulge in similar feelings and sensations. It’s a community within itself. 

From Poor Economics: How People Live on $2 a Day
From GOOD.

From Poor Economics: How People Live on $2 a Day

From GOOD.

LogoI attended a fantastic five-week short-film festival in one of Cape Town’s coolest venues, The DreamFactory. Not only does this open space naturally induce creativity and imagination, the series, creatively entitled, 'Short & Sweet,' brought about some of South Africa’s finest documentary filmmakers, animators, and producers.

The event’s host prefaced the films, saying: this is not a feature film series, and what you’re about to see is meant to leave you wondering, frustrated, thinking, and exploring. It’s a collection of artistic movement.

Check out the details:

Launch: Tuesday, 28 June and EVERY Tuesday in July!

Time: Doors open at 18h00, films start at 19h30, venue closes at 23h00

Entry: R20

Currently reading: Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty. 
What a fantastic read and I’m only 50 pages in. The book gives you insight into how impoverished communities behave, work, and live - what they know, how they perceive concepts and ideas, and what their expectations are.
Thus far, the book’s examined how people making less than $1 a day live. How do they survive when it comes to food. Do food subsidies count? What’s more important: nutrition or caloric intake? and do these differences truly affect work productivity? how do you encourage nutritional food consumption and long-term health effects when people only act and live day-to-day?
Keep you all updated on my thoughts and progress with the book. I’m only 1/5th of the way through and it’s already become a wealth of knowledge :)
Read the book and check out their data and graphs HERE.

Currently reading: Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty. 

What a fantastic read and I’m only 50 pages in. The book gives you insight into how impoverished communities behave, work, and live - what they know, how they perceive concepts and ideas, and what their expectations are.

Thus far, the book’s examined how people making less than $1 a day live. How do they survive when it comes to food. Do food subsidies count? What’s more important: nutrition or caloric intake? and do these differences truly affect work productivity? how do you encourage nutritional food consumption and long-term health effects when people only act and live day-to-day?

Keep you all updated on my thoughts and progress with the book. I’m only 1/5th of the way through and it’s already become a wealth of knowledge :)

Read the book and check out their data and graphs HERE.